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past exhibitions


July 20 to October 7, 2018

Robert Dyson. Pencils and soft canvas, 2017. Mixed media.

ContraStructural

Robert Dyson

From Prince George, Robert Dyson is a sculptor and photographer who also works in the world of theatre, fabricating sets and props. His new work draws upon theatre-craft as he produces hybrids of painting and low relief sculpture that communicate pressure and tension. Elements within the frame, and at times the frames themselves, appear to be compressed or pulled apart using pulleys, clamps and other devices. Using trompe l’oeil and other effects, Dyson’s work appears to be heavily sprung and on the verge of letting go. 

July 20 to October 7, 2018

Dan Brault. Bonfire!, 2017. Acrylic and oil on canvas.

Atomic Love

Dan Brault

Québec City painter, Dan Brault, is a self-professed cynic. Rather than kick at a withering raft of global concerns, in his paintings, however, Brault ejects them entirely from his work. Issues like climate change and environmental decline, are more than simply absent in his paintings. He carefully composes his work to counter the anxiety and malcontent these and other concerns cause. Using a range of painting techniques and media he fashions paintings that, while auto-biographical, draw from common experiences in the world around him. Fishing, camping and video games are among the subject matter that Brault tackles lending his work a wide-ranging resonance as he creates paintings that are uplifting antidotes to these troubled times.

April 13 to July 8, 2018

Lawren Harris. Autumn: Design for a Panel, c. 1945. Oil on paperboard. Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Gift of the Vancouver Art Gallery Women's Auxiliary. (Photo: Trevor Mills, Vancouver Art Gallery.)

Canadian Visionary

Lawren Harris

A member of the Group of Seven, Lawren Stewart Harris (1885–1970) was one of the most important figures in the history of Canadian art. After settling in Vancouver in 1940, he was a central figure in the artistic life of British Columbia. Through both his life and work, Harris helped establish an identity for Canadian art and was a driving force in the development of modernist painting. This exhibition focuses on artwork from between 1906 and 1960 and includes artwork on paper, oil sketches and paintings.

Lawren Harris: Canadian Visionary is organized and circulated by the Vancouver Art Gallery with the generous support of the Killy Foundation and is curated by Ian M. Thom, Senior Curator-Historical, Vancouver Art Gallery.

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April 13 to July 8, 2018

Kim Stewart: Indian Chief, 2017. Digital print on paper.

INJUN-uity, or Growing Up Pop

Kim Stewart

Métis artist Kim Stewart from Prince George explores stereotypes of Indigeneity and examines how representations of it in popular media influenced her own sense of self. Using a broad range of media including video, digital prints, beadwork and installation work, Stewart reconciles childhood stories and memories of play alongside pop cultural references of Indigenous culture. Her work considers the depth to which stereotypes can permeate ones identity and influence a sense of self.

March 15 to May 14, 2018

Maureen Faulkner. December 364, 2016. Watercolour on paper.

Cultivating Habit

Maureen Faulkner

On January 1st, 2016, Prince George artist Maureen Faulkner committed to paint an artwork per day for the duration of the year. She determined the size of her paintings would increase by an inch in both height and length each month and that she would compose a piece of automatic writing to accompany each work. Faulkner shared her paintings digitally through her social media channels and invited followers of the project to mail her objects that she could feature in her paintings. This multidimensional body of work has been an exercise in commitment, daily reflection, and communication.

January 18 - April 1 2018

Lori Goldberg. Reconstructing Nature III, 2017. Acrylic on canvas. 24" x 36"

Fences - Artists from across BC

Shirley Babcock, Emilie Crewe, Samantha Dickie, Lori Goldberg, Betty Kovacic, mary mottishaw, Susan Neilson, Perry Rath, Michael Rees, Rachel Rozanski

Like a wall, fences keep people, animals, or things apart from each other, control access, or prevent escape. A fence can be an invisible boundary built from assumptions, preconceptions, cultural differences, and bias - or a friendly boundary born of respect. In the face of a resurgent global nationalism, fences and walls have particular connotations. We're inviting BC artists to consider the power 'fences' have over our behaviour and the different types of physical or metaphoric fences that exist politically, socially and personally. Artwork by artists working in a range of media will be selected from across the province.

January 18 - April 1 2018

Mitchell Wiebe. What're Friends For Part IV, 2004. Oil on canvas.

Bad Magic

Mitchell Wiebe

Rainbows, unicorns and other figures populate Halifax artist Mitchell Wiebe’s paintings. As wry embodiments of humour and kitsch, they declare the artist’s deep commitment to the imagination. While he draws from art movements that include symbolism and surrealism, Wiebe ultimate aims to lose himself to a deeply intuitive approach to painting. The world that emerges through these large paintings offer an irreverent, revelrous and sometimes raucous spectacle, in which the viewer might lose themselves in turn.

Summer 2017 - Fall 2018

Standing Split

Standing Split

David Jacob Harder

A circle of logs standing on their ends, pointed towards the sky, recalls the forests that surround the city of Prince George. David Jacob Harder constructed this sculptural-installation using a single fir tree that has been sectioned and sawed in half. The interior of the logs face outward, exposed, while the rounded-bark-covered side faces inward, hidden from initial view. At the center of artwork is a wooden bench that can be accessed through an opening in the circle. From the vantage point of the bench, the work appears to shield one from the surrounding urban environment. As much as Standing Split may function as a space for solitude, it also represents an investigation into the relationship between the forest and the city.

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